From Logos to Spirit Revisited:
The Development of the Epiclesis in Syria and Egypt

Nathan P. Chase

Abstract

Scholars have long debated how the anaphoral epiclesis developed and when a pneumatic epiclesis first appeared in Eucharistic celebrations. This has led scholars to discuss some of the earliest Syrian and Egyptian evidence, in particular the epicleses in the Acts of Thomas and the anaphora of Sarapion of Thmuis, and whether epicletic developments in Syria and Egypt paralleled one another. Recent work on δύναµις («Power») epicleses, and new examples of these epicleses in Egypt, strengthens the case that epicletic developments in Syria and Egypt followed a similar trajectory: 1) requests for Christ’s presence; 2) requests for the Son, using titles like Logos, Power, Name; 3) requests for both the Son and Spirit; and finally, 4) requests for the Spirit alone.


Sommario

A lungo si è dibattuto su come si sia sviluppata l’epiclesi anaforica e quando sia apparsa per la prima volta un’epiclesi pneumatica nelle celebrazioni eucaristiche. Questo ha portato gli studiosi a discutere alcune delle prime testimonianze siriane ed egiziane, in particolare le epiclesi negli Atti di Tommaso e l’anafora di Serapione di Thmuis, e se lo sviluppo epicletico in Siria e in Egitto fosse parallelo. Il recente lavoro sulle epiclesi-δύναµις (“Potenza”), e nuovi esempi di queste epiclesi in Egitto, rafforzano l’ipotesi che gli sviluppi dell’epiclesi in Siria e in Egitto seguissero una traiettoria simile: 1) richieste per la presenza di Cristo; 2) richieste per il Figlio, usando titoli come Logos, Potenza, Nome; 3) richieste sia per il Figlio sia per lo Spirito; e infine, 4) richieste per il solo Spirito.

Nathan P. Chase, B.A., Boston College; M.A. Liturgical Studies and M.A. Theology-Systematics, Saint John’s School of Theology-Seminary; Advanced Masters in Church History, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven; Ph.D. Liturgical Studies, University of Notre Dame. Assistant Professor of Liturgical and Sacramental Theology at the Aquinas Institute of Theology Saint Louis (MO).

.

Editorial
Adnotationes
Index
Book Reviews
Sources